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 TinType Photo Images Marketplace

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If you are a buyer, a collector or a antique dealer   and would like to offer your products  in our  Marketplace or open your free supply store you have come to the right place.We offer publishers, photographers and dealers a place where to show their items listed for sale at auction or fixed price offering buyers a complete line, a huge variety of products and accessories they can choose from.

A tintype  is a photographic process first described by Adolphe-Alexandre Martin in France in 1853, and patented in the United States and  the United Kingdom in 1856. It was first called melainotype, then ferrotype and finally tintype. All three names describe both the process and the resulting photograph.

Tintypes are made by a wet-plate process, in which the photographic emulsion is contained in liquid collodion. The tintype was a minor improvement to the ambrotype, replacing the glass plate of the original process with a thin piece of black-enameled, or japanned, iron (hence ferro). The new materials reduced costs considerably; and the image, in gelatin-silver emulsion on the varnished surface, has proven to be very durable.   Tintypes are simple and fast to prepare, compared to other early photographic techniques. A photographer could prepare, expose, develop, and varnish a tintype plate in a few minutes, quickly having it ready for a customer. Earlier tintypes were often cased, as were daguerreotypes and ambrotypes; but uncased images in paper sleeves and for albums were popular from the beginning.

the tintype process superseded the ambrotype in the United States by the end of the Civil War and it became the most common photographic process until the introduction of modern, gelatin-based processes and the invention of the reloadable amateur camera by the Kodak company. .
 

 

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